Continuous Query Decomposition

Continuous Query Decomposition for Complex Query Answering in Incomplete Knowledge Graphs

Update

We implemented CQD in the KGReasoning framework, a library from SNAP implementing several Complex Query Answering models, which also supports experimenting with the Query2Box and BetaE datasets (in this repo, we only consider the former). Our implementation is available at this link.


This repository contains the official implementation for our ICLR 2021 (Oral, Outstanding Paper Award) paper, Complex Query Answering with Neural Link Predictors:

@inproceedings{
    arakelyan2021complex,
    title={Complex Query Answering with Neural Link Predictors},
    author={Erik Arakelyan and Daniel Daza and Pasquale Minervini and Michael Cochez},
    booktitle={International Conference on Learning Representations},
    year={2021},
    url={https://openreview.net/forum?id=Mos9F9kDwkz}
}

In this work we present CQD, a method that reuses a pretrained link predictor to answer complex queries, by scoring atom predicates independently and aggregating the scores via t-norms and t-conorms.

Our code is based on an implementation of ComplEx-N3 available here.

Please follow the instructions next to reproduce the results in our experiments.

1. Install the requirements

We recommend creating a new environment:

% conda create --name cqd python=3.8 && conda activate cqd
% pip install -r requirements.txt

2. Download the data

We use 3 knowledge graphs: FB15k, FB15k-237, and NELL.
From the root of the repository, download and extract the files to obtain the folder data, containing the sets of triples and queries for each graph.

% wget http://data.neuralnoise.com/cqd-data.tgz
% tar xvf cqd-data.tgz

3. Download the models

Then you need neural link prediction models -- one for each of the datasets.
Our pre-trained neural link prediction models are available here:

% wget http://data.neuralnoise.com/cqd-models.tgz
% tar xvf cqd-models.tgz

3. Alternative -- Train your own models

To obtain entity and relation embeddings, we use ComplEx. Use the next commands to train the embeddings for each dataset.

FB15k

% python -m kbc.learn data/FB15k --rank 1000 --reg 0.01 --max_epochs 100  --batch_size 100

FB15k-237

% python -m kbc.learn data/FB15k-237 --rank 1000 --reg 0.05 --max_epochs 100  --batch_size 1000

NELL

% python -m kbc.learn data/NELL --rank 1000 --reg 0.05 --max_epochs 100  --batch_size 1000

Once training is done, the models will be saved in the models directory.

4. Answering queries with CQD

CQD can answer complex queries via continuous (CQD-CO) or combinatorial optimisation (CQD-Beam).

CQD-Beam

Use the kbc.cqd_beam script to answer queries, providing the path to the dataset, and the saved link predictor trained in the previous step. For example,

% python -m kbc.cqd_beam --model_path models/[model_filename].pt

Example:

% PYTHONPATH=. python3 kbc/cqd_beam.py \
  --model_path models/FB15k-model-rank-1000-epoch-100-*.pt \
  --dataset FB15K --mode test --t_norm product --candidates 64 \
  --scores_normalize 0 data/FB15k

models/FB15k-model-rank-1000-epoch-100-1602520745.pt FB15k product 64
ComplEx(
  (embeddings): ModuleList(
    (0): Embedding(14951, 2000, sparse=True)
    (1): Embedding(2690, 2000, sparse=True)
  )
)

[..]

This will save a series of JSON fils with results, e.g.

% cat "topk_d=FB15k_t=product_e=2_2_rank=1000_k=64_sn=0.json"
{
  "MRRm_new": 0.7542805715523118,
  "MRm_new": 50.71081983144581,
  "[email protected]_new": 0.6896709378392843,
  "[email protected]_new": 0.7955001359095913,
  "[email protected]_new": 0.8676865172456019
}

CQD-CO

Use the kbc.cqd_co script to answer queries, providing the path to the dataset, and the saved link predictor trained in the previous step. For example,

% python -m kbc.cqd_co data/FB15k --model_path models/[model_filename].pt --chain_type 1_2

Final Results

All results from the paper can be produced as follows:

% cd results/topk
% ../topk-parse.py *.json | grep rank=1000
d=FB15K rank=1000 & 0.779 & 0.584 & 0.796 & 0.837 & 0.377 & 0.658 & 0.839 & 0.355
d=FB237 rank=1000 & 0.279 & 0.219 & 0.352 & 0.457 & 0.129 & 0.249 & 0.284 & 0.128
d=NELL rank=1000 & 0.343 & 0.297 & 0.410 & 0.529 & 0.168 & 0.283 & 0.536 & 0.157
% cd ../cont
% ../cont-parse.py *.json | grep rank=1000
d=FB15k rank=1000 & 0.454 & 0.191 & 0.796 & 0.837 & 0.336 & 0.513 & 0.816 & 0.319
d=FB15k-237 rank=1000 & 0.213 & 0.131 & 0.352 & 0.457 & 0.146 & 0.222 & 0.281 & 0.132
d=NELL rank=1000 & 0.265 & 0.220 & 0.410 & 0.529 & 0.196 & 0.302 & 0.531 & 0.194

Generating explanations

When using CQD-Beam for query answering, we can inspect intermediate decisions.
We provide an example implementation for the case of 2p queries over FB15k-237,
that generates a log file. To generate this log, add the --explain flag when running the
cqd_beam script. The file will be saved as explain.log.

Note: for readability, this requires an extra file mapping FB15k-237 entity identifiers
to their original names. Download the file from this link
to the data/FB15k-237 path and untar it.

GitHub

https://github.com/uclnlp/cqd